Guest Writer
May 10, 2014

The Government Battles with the Growing Sharing Economy

The Sharing Economy is a misunderstood new wave of business, but it’s causing enough of a stir in a handful of industries that it has caught the attention of consumers and businesses alike. The Internet infused applications instigate exchange of goods and services among consumers – a far cry from the traditional business to consumer model of the most powerful and equally profitable industries. These apps have grown in popularity, and in certain instances with the type of zeal that has the potential to cause mass hysteria from consumers utilizing these new community-based businesses.

By Diana Zelikman from Fueled (New York’s leading mobile app development and once in a while they write blog entries for betahaus.)

As of now, the Sharing Economy ideal poses a number of legal questions surrounding government regulation that can’t be easily answered. We, at Fueled, thought we’d check out one business whose implicated itself below.

Company: Airbnb

Coming on the market, fast and loud, with a peer to peer exchange of a constantly sought after asset, Airbnb is an online community network that quickly connects individuals with rental properties to those who are seeking a place to stay on a short-term, temporary basis. Whether customers are looking for a quiet getaway in the mountains of Colorado or need a cozy penthouse with a view deep into the ever busy hub of Manhattan, this mobile app based company provides a means to an end, in a notably inexpensive way. Those who have property to rent on a short-term basis are able to do so with ease by posting the property online, giving way to a money making connection that would otherwise have been unavailable.

The Issue: Short-term Rentals and the Law

Although this may seem like a beautifully simple way to connect needy consumers without the overreaching arm of big business types, cities across the nation are concerned with the regulatory side of this apartment-to-bed-and-breakfast concept. The biggest issue? Regulations that relate directly to the business of short-term rentals are being called into play, specifically in the state of New York. Recently a statewide subpoena was issued to cease business activities for thousands of rental properties within the state, noting that the use of Airbnb to rent out a property violates these broad regulations.

The Basis for Complaint

The “Illegal Hotel Law,” an antiquated piece of legislation, was updated in 2010 to vaguely outlaw the “business” of renting an apartment for fewer than 30 days if the apartment owner is not present. This, in turn, has created a frustrating situation for the state while it attempts to collect potential tax revenue as well as enforce safety and insurance regulations that are applicable normally to solely traditional hotels.

The Complaining Parties

Both the State of New York, in this case, as well as the businesses that stand to lose a hefty portion of an otherwise solid market share - the booming (and outlandishly expensive) New York hotel industry - and are trying to save the changing dynamic of the hotel industry. Their reasoning is if large hotel chains are susceptible to government imposition through regulation, the same should be expected of Airbnb users since they provide similar services.

What’s Next?

Without viable regulations that can be applied directly to practicing sharing economy businesses such as Airbnb, it is nearly impossible to impose the type of control the state of New York is seeking. The concept that competition within an industry is only possible between big players is beginning to waver and large corporations are scrambling to create roadblocks wherever they can. Many similar issues were present when e-commerce sites like eBay and Amazon launched, so it’s clear that government regulations and the laws are out of date to say the least. There is no clear answer, however, to the New York Airbnb issue yet. But with the popularity of the Sharing Economy coming in strong, something will need to be done in an effort to remedy the problems facing renters – both those providing the property and those utilizing them – and the breakdown of big business as the only option within the hotel industry.

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To be honest, I sort of fell into it. I was always working somewhere between content marketing and the music industry and around seven years ago a friend of a friend was searching for someone to help him curating music for his boutique surf spot on the beach in Costa Rica. The owner was a big music fan, but he just didn't have time to keep all the music up-to-date. So I got introduced to him, we shared similar tastes, and agreed that I would do the music for his space - curating it and updating it with new music on a regular basis.

This for me was a dream come true. I could finally work with music all day, and at the same time, I could help create an awesome experience for the guests. I saw people's reactions when they heard a song they liked. I saw them dancing, getting a little closer to each other at the bar and that for me was really rewarding.

This was the moment when I realized that there is something special about this idea and I got interested if there is actually market out there. I did some market research, and a lot of interviews with different hoteliers people in the industry trying to get more feedback. And the idea started growing more and more. 

People in beta Clay Bassford Bespoke Sound



Interesting is the story of the last years winner in the category “Creative”. Hamburg based headraft literally took music experience to the next level by creating the world’s first AR Music Video for the German band “die Fantastischen Vier”. Designed for their song “Tunnel”, the cited app unfolds a virtual story world once the track starts playing, giving fans the opportunity to go on an interactive journey with the band rather than being a passive viewer. 

Applications are now open! Finalists will be awaited by a curious jury of five leading industry experts. Among others, Kathleen Cohen who was already taking part in the first year will be in the panel of judges again. With a 25-year multiplatform career history under her belt, she is one of the most regarded in the field. As a digital experience expert, she has successfully implemented projects for DreamWorks Interactive and IBM Innovation, to name a few.

Needless to say, the yearly AUREA Award is definitely the place to be. Apply and become a member of the community bringing together all the promising products and solutions in the AR/VR sector.

Photo by AUREA Award

OKAY BUT HOW IS BESPOKE SOUND DIFFERENT THAN PLAYING MY "DISCOVER WEEKLY’’ OR ANY OTHER AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED PLAYLIST ?

Well, both. Currently we offer the following two options: shorter publicly available Brand Playlists and long-form private Soundtracks for spaces. For both of them we work closely with the client to understand how sound fits into their brand DNA and what their audience is like.

We believe that the guests’ experience with a particular space doesn’t have to begin and end with their stay. The idea of the Brand Playlist is to be a public brand playlists designed to engage the customers before, during, and after their visit at a space. It’s always accessible for them and serves as a new, dynamic marketing channel.

The Soundtrack is slightly different. It takes sometimes up to weeks of work and is designed by a world-class artist, DJ, or tastemaker. For it we first work with you to develop a deep understanding of your business and style. Then we match you with the perfect artist, DJ, or tastemaker to create unique, always fresh playlists, custom tailored to match your brand. 

In both cases, we update them regularly based on guest habits and clients’ needs. 

People in beta Clay Bassford Bespoke Sound



The way we engage with the music community is something really important for us and honestly, what makes us different than other background music providers. A lot of the background music providers out there have internal teams of maybe five or six DJs that do all of the music for their clients. We aim to connect with the local scene and always work with local DJs. There's some kind of magic in finding the exact right artists for the brand.

And on the flip side of it, when we hire artists, we make sure that the project is also inspiring for them and that they would be interested in participating. We always make sure to pay them well. The whole project creates for them a new income stream that they wouldn't have otherwise.

People in beta Clay Bassford Bespoke Sound

Yes! This was really fun. The objective with the betahaus "betabeer sounds" playlist was to showcase the community side of betahaus. There are so many cool, interesting people in the betahaus community and we thought a playlist could be a perfect way to not only help bring the community together but also show the diverse funkiness of the communities of Berlin and Neukölln, which is why Hazy Pockets, a longtime local Berlin DJ known for his eclectic mixes, was perfect for this project.

This playlist moves from bluesy 60s rock into surf and tropicalia, picking up momentum into Motown and onwards through some laid back disco tunes. Perfect for the betabeer events betahaus hosts monthly!


YOU’RE CURRENTLY ENJOYING THE SUN FAR FROM BERLIN. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE PLACES in berlin that YOU MISS THE MOST?

Oh, there are just so many! Like the Imren Grill for instance where you can find the best homemade Turkish food or Das Gift and Gordon which are both run by great music people. Kohelenquelle in Prenzleuer Berg is my favorite local bar (or rather kneipe). To satisfy my  techno / electronic records needs I always go to Hard Wax and one of my most special places is the Zions Kirche steeple, which has an awesome view of the city and a great Weinerei close by. 


You can see me around betahaus. Online, you can always check out my website and listen to our public playlists on Spotify. We’re also currently working on a collaboration with betahaus, so a special Playlist curated by is will very soon sound around the spaces in Kreuzberg and Neukölln. 

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